forex öppettider örebro Cuttington University’s President honored Bong County Superintendent Induction Ceremony

By: Kweshie Tetteh/PRO-CU

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Cuttington University President, Dr. Herman B. Browne graced the induction ceremony of Bong County third female Superintendent, Madam. Esther Y. M. Walker in Gbarnga City, Bong County. The special Induction Ceremony was also witnessed by the Madam Jewel Howard-Taylor, Vice President of the Republic of Liberia, The Honorable Deputy Speaker of the 54th National Legislature, Hon. Prince K. Moye, Hon. Varney V. Sirleaf, Minister of Internal Affairs and others.

In her concluding statement during her induction speech, Superintendent Walker thanked President Weah for confiding in her ability to serve her people of Bong County. She further stated that her primary focus is to support the Government’s Pro-Poor Agenda that will encourage peace and reconciliation in Bong County and Liberia.

Madam Walker admonished the young people of Bong County to respect their leaders. She said, “gone are those days when young people would take the radio and rain insults at their leaders, a practice which is seriously against the traditions of our African Society”.  

 In a chat with the Cuttington University President Dr. Herman B. Browne, Superintendent Walker promised to work closely with the Cuttington University leadership toward the achievement of the Government’s Pro-Poor Agenda in supporting university education.

pacifier inventor Government needs to improve its supports to Cuttington University


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aprire un conto reale iq option  By: Kweshie Tetteh  

Since its establishment in February 1889 in Happer City Maryland County, the nation’s oldest private institution of higher learning has been providing quality university education for both nationals and foreigners and has continue the practice to date.

By virtue of the charter creating Cuttington University, the Government of Liberia committed itself supporting the operational cost of the university and this is why it is represented on the University’s Board by the Minister of Education and/or the Superintendent of Bong County.

The institution moved to Bong County in the 50s when it was referred to as the Central Region and was given one thousand, five hundred acres of land by the Government of Liberia as well as a social responsibility to cater to the educational needs of people within the region which comprised of Bong, Nimba and Lofa. Since Cuttington assumed this solemn responsibility for preparing quality human resource of Liberia, the Liberian Government has not been able to adequately meet Cutting ton’s demand for the support required to meet the specified objectives. 

Like scores of other institutions of higher learning, it was equally ravished by years of civil war that dislodged its administration, faculty, students and vandalized strategic facilities including laboratories, library, clinic, homes, amongst others. It also served as a base of the National Patriotic Front of former President Charles Taylor during the height of our national crisis in which lives and properties were destroyed.

Since the end of hostilities, Cuttington returned to its original mandate and is the only institution in Liberia that operates educational programs from Nursery/Kindergarten to a Masters’ Program. On the main campus in Suakoko    that hosts the undergraduate programs as well as several certificate and diploma programs, there is also a Senior High School which runs from kindergarten to the twelveth grade that feeds directly into the Bachelor’s porgram. In Kakata, Margibi County, the Administration  was able to purchase twenty (20) acres of land and constructed a modern structure that houses its Junior College program and to top it all up, there is the Cuttington University School of Graduate and Professional Studies in Monrovia located in Oldest Congo Town, opposite the National Headquarters of the Congress for Democratic Change.

As part of its social obligation, the Administration during the Ebola outbreak opened its doors to the International Medical Corps. The institution contracted by USAID operated the Regional Ebola Treatment Unit in Bong County as well as the Mobile Testing Lab of the United States Department of Defense in its newly constructed College of Allied Health Sciences on the Suakoko’s premises.

Now that the election is over, and the economy is expected to improve, the University is eager to negotiate how she might be able to keep her doors open in order to meaningfully prepare the human capital for the nation’s challenges of tomorrow.


cosa significa opzioni digitali GRADUATION DAY: Commencement Exercises new turn

Supported by the Board of Trustees,  counselled by Faculty Senate and Executive Council, CU has seen a good deal of re-ordering of the way we operate   since Dr B took over the helm of affairs at the University.  He is making a difference in three main ways:  (1) upgrading and expanding our facilities on three campuses so that the learning experience is enhanced, and our services better delivered.  (2) reviewing curricular issues (college preparation, entry procedures, remediation, pedagogy, faculty appointments and  development) and outcomes. (3) streamlining operational budget and maximizing domestic revenue streams.

GRADUATION DAY: Unlike previous years, Commencement exercises now run over two days with each program (Associate, Undergraduate,  Postgraduate) enjoying the pomp,  pageantry, and decorum appropriate to mark the merit of the occasion in recognition of students’ achievement. Each program holds its own baccalaureate service in the locale in which their studies were conducted  a week leading to graduation. Gone are the days when all three programs had a single baccalaureate service and a single graduation event.


follow site OUTSOURCING: Financially burdensome sectors within the university offering auxiliary services are being outsourced.  Their  impact and productivity might be better felt if directly managed by a smaller pool of experienced pery  profitable terms and conditions  in a legally binding and periodically  reviewable way. Other areas to be outsourced,  awaiting Board’s approval,  are the Security and Janitorial services, the Campus School, and the Farm

ACADEMICS: In the undergrad program we have made Philosophy a required course; and appointed 6 terminally degreed faculty across the campuses. At the Graduate school we have reviewed and set new regulations for the entire thesis exercise with  an eye to qualitative and quantitative analyses, as well as literary proficiency. We have also revisited the procedures for moving from program  level within the University to another (i.e. Associate to undergrad, or undergrad  to grad school) and made such articulations less inconsistent.


source site VP Reaffirms GOL Commitment to Cuttington University



Vice President Jewel Howard-Taylor has reaffirmed Government of Liberia’s commitment to support Cuttington University. She made the statement during the 129th Anniversary celebrations on the University’s main campus in Suakoko, Bong County. She promised to work closely with President George M. Weah to ensure the timely payment of the University’s subsidy.

In the wake of numerous challenges confronting the University, the Vice President pledged eight thousand gallons of fuel and presented two thousand –five hundred united state dollars check to the administration. She also promised to engage Orange-Liberia to provide internet service (Wi-Fi) on the University’s main campus in Suakoko, Bong County.

Meanwhile, the Vice President reminded the students to make maximum use of the available opportunities in pursuit of their education and encouraged them to take advantage of the sciences.

Responding to the gesture, Dr. Herman B. Browne, President of Cuttington University thanked the Vice President Jewel Howard-Taylor for her support to the University and said that her support was very timely and that it will help the university in solving some of many challenges confronting the institution


vorrei fare trading con eseguito con costi bassi quale banca scegliere Triads Exams- aptitude exams for CU students



The University administration has  initiated  a set of three aptitude exams to CU students as they move from one level of academic work  to the next. These exams (we call ‘Triads’ ) will test three sets of skills at the end of each year, and form a basis for assessing one’s readiness for Graduation. (1) Reading skills (comprehension,  oral); at the end of Freshman Year. (2)Writing skills (vocabulary, composition, fluency); at the end of Sophomore Year. (3)           Thinking skills (logic, dialectic reasoning, personal reflection) end of Junior Year.

PROJECTS:   .07km concrete pavement on main campus have been completed;  The Library is undergoing 30% extension, and 5 faculty houses are being built (thanks to USAID) to be completed by end of year!;  The G-Stand’s seating  capacity has been extended by 30% (by Class of 2017) and tiled ; 1000 new   arm chairs, for all three campuses were purchased and delivered to the Graduate School and Junior College; Solar paneled lights have been purchased for the three campuses for security purpose;  An Electronic (Allen) Organ has been purchased and installed in the University Chapel; To solve more permanently water shortage from the river nearby, we have had  4 boreholes dug on campus; A new 500KVA Perkins generator  was purchased and installed; Tractor and lawn-mowers procured and in use for the care of the  grounds;  The thesis Hall  (near the WVST library) was erected by Class of 2016 and  fully constructed  by the administration; with the help of CUAAA huge quantity of paint, computers, sporting equipment  were deployed in the university offices. Cuttington Junior College

cuenta prueba opciones binarias CONSTRUCTION AT CJC: Apart from the extensive renovation works on Cuttington Junior College classes, library, offices, and auditorium, construction isnearing completion of its student center.  Plans are afoot to ensure that accommodation is available on that site for staff and students. We are pleased that CJC, located on Bong Mines Road, Kakata is growing in strength and organizational efficiency, after multiple senior personnel changes. E.rollment size is approx. 200. CONSTRUCTION AT GRADUATE SCHOOL: we are constructing a four storey classroom/complex at the Graduate School in Monrovia that is likely to triple the present classroom capacity; and be much better equipped than our present occupancy. The School of Graduate and Professional Studies has a new dynamic Vice President for Graduate Studies, Dee Nyamieh Walker, Ed.D. Enrollment is approx. 650.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- John Gay, Ph.D.  & Judy Gay, Ph.D. Judy and John Gay are American citizens who taught at Cuttington College from 1958 to 1973. John was born and grew up in a suburb of Chicago in the state of Illinois. His parents moved to Philadelphia Pennsylvania where John attended high school in Upper Darby. He then attended Cornell University in upstate New York where he received the degree of Bachelor of Engineering Physics in 1951. He went on to Princeton University where he studied mathematics and earned the degree of Master of Arts. Judy was born in New York City in 1933, attended high school in her hometown of Manhasset on Long Island in New York state, and went to Wellesley College in Massachusetts where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree, majoring in English and biblical studies, in 1954.

click here Judy and John met each other in January 1952 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. John made monthly visits from Princeton to Wellesley thereafter to deepen a relationship which led to marriage in June 1954. After a summer working for the United States Forest Service, they attended Union Theological Seminary and Columbia University in New York City from which John received the degrees of Bachelor of Divinity in 1954 and Doctor of Philosophy in 1958, and Judy the degree of Master of Arts in church history.

Their first two children Peter and Lisa were born in New York City in 1957 and 1958. With these two children John and Judy flew to Liberia where they took up residence at Cuttington College in 1958. Their third child Stephen was born in Zorzor in 1962.

John was head of the social sciences division, and taught a variety of subjects in the humanities, conducted research in aspects of cultural and social life in both rural and urban Liberia, and supervised student research in comparable areas. Judy taught courses in Christian education at the Cuttington Seminary, as well as courses in English language and literature with special emphasis on African authors. Judy was faculty advisor to the Cuttington Review and did extensive fieldwork for the Christian Education Department of the Episcopal Diocese of Liberia. During this time their daughter Lisa died and was buried in a secluded section of the Cuttington campus. A fourth child David was born a year later.

Judy and John and their children then spent half a year of research in 1974 in the remote Kpelle village of Gbansu, where John studied traditional agriculture and Judy study traditional folklore. They went from there to Cambridge University in England where John taught and did research in the anthropology department, while Judy began her work toward the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Social Anthropology. The family moved from Cambridge England to Lesotho where John did research on development studies and taught at the University, while Judy completed her doctorate in 1980 with a dissertation on the role of women in Lesotho.

Their work in Lesotho broadened out to include anti-apartheid activities for the Transformation Resource Center in Maseru, the capital of Lesotho. They also did theological education for the Anglican diocese of Lesotho, where Judy realized her lifelong dream of being ordained as a priest. During his last years in Lesotho John did research on economic and social development for the Sechaba Consultants Organization in Maseru.

John and Judy then retired in 2001 and moved to Cambridge Massachusetts where they still live and continue their contacts with colleagues and friends and students from Africa and Asia. Mr. Kenneth Y. Best is joining us to represent the Gay’s at this event!

 Honoring the founder of Cuttington University

The Right Reverend Samuel David Ferguson, D.D., D.C.L.

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On Wednesday, June 24, 1885 (St. John the Baptist Feast Day), the Reverend Samuel David Ferguson from Liberia was consecrated the first black bishop of the Episcopal Church of the United States of America. Bishop Ferguson was also the first black person to sit in the House of Bishops of the Episcopal Church.  All seventy-six of the other bishops were white men. His consecration as Missionary Bishop of Cape Palmas and Parts Adjacent (later titled Missionary Bishop of Liberia) was performed at Grace Church in New York, New York. The then Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church the Most Reverend Alfred Lee, Bishop of Delaware, in the presence of a hosts of other bishops, clergy, and guests performed the ordination.   Born in Charleston, South Carolina, on January 1, 1842, at age six he emigrated to Liberia with his parents in 1848, the year after Liberia’s Declaration of Independence.   Ferguson was educated in Episcopal schools in Sinoe and Maryland, and later tutored by the first Episcopal Missionary bishop in Liberia the Rt. Reverend John Payne.  He received honorary doctorate degrees from American colleges. 

Dr. Ferguson was the fourth bishop of the Liberian Episcopal Church.  During his 31 years of service as bishop, he laid the foundation for expansion of the Church’s work by emphasizing Christian education and self-sufficiency.  The Church grew rapidly under his leadership.  In fact, because of his dynamism historians label him “the Education Bishop”.  Bishop Ferguson pushed his idea of vibrant training programs in theology, agriculture, and industry.  He lobbied and obtained an initial grant of five thousand dollars from the New York financier Robert Fulton Cutting.  With that major contribution Epiphany Hall was constructed in Cape Palmas, and thus began the now enviable story of today’s Cuttington University.   In 1909, Bishop Ferguson established Bromley Mission as a school for girls.  That school remains active.  Reverend Ferguson also brought and introduced, starting from Cape Palmas, Liberia’s first Young Men’s Christian Association (the YMCA); the first Women’s Auxiliary of the Episcopal Church; and the Episcopal Church’s Order of the Sons and Daughters of the King. 

On Wednesday, August 2, 1916, Bishop Ferguson’s earthly journey ended after his dedicated service to the Church and the State, and after reverently obeying Jesus’ command: “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations baptizing them in the name of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” Matthew 28 verse 19. 

In respect and faithful recognition of his commitment and trailblazing performance as the first black Bishop, the Episcopal Church in the United States commemorates the Feast of Samuel David Ferguson on August 2nd each year with the following prayer:

 “Almighty God, we bless you for moving your servant Samuel Ferguson to minister in Liberia, expanding the missionary vision of your Church in education and ministry.  Stir up in us a zeal for your mission and a yearning for your holy Word; through Jesus Christ, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns forever and ever. Amen”


  1. Elwood Dunn, Ph.D.
  2.  Elwood Dunn was born to a single mother in Lower Buchanan, Grand Bassa County January 28, 1942 and raised by maternal grandparents who sunk deep into his being the values of Christian faith, modern education, and hard work. He graduated Bassa High School in 1960, and Cuttington College and Divinity School 1964, and was certificated in French in 1967 at the Universite de Lyon in France. He pursued graduate studies at American University in Washington DC, receiving the Ph.D. degree in International Studies in 1972.

He began his academic career as lecturer at the Roman Catholic Seton Hall University in New Jersey (USA) while still a graduate student in 1970 and rose to assistant professor of African studies before resigning in 1974 to return home. Government service beaconed, as he would spend the next three years as an assistant minister of foreign affairs and director of the Foreign Service Institute. On request he commuted weekends in 1975 to teach two courses at Cuttington. He transferred in 1977 to the Executive Mansion as Deputy Minister of State for Presidential Affairs/Director of Cabinet, subsequently becoming the Minister of State for Presidential Affairs/Chief of Staff to President William R. Tolbert, 1979. He was dismissed from government service in the wake of the 1980 coup d’état, and he consequently returned to academia, briefly teaching at the University of Liberia before returning to the U.S. where in August 1981 he was employed at the Episcopal Sewanee: The University of the South. He would remain at Sewanee for 31 eventful years, serving in various faculty capacities including chairman of the Department of Politics, and subsequently the Alfred Walter Negley Professor of Politics, retaining the title in retirement with the suffix “emeritus” added.

As a scholar, Dunn served as editor of the American-based Liberian Studies Journal, 1985-95, and has authored, co-authored, and edited several books and articles. Among his publications are: The Foreign Policy of Liberia During the Tubman Era 1944-1971, (1979), Historical Dictionary of Liberia, 1st edition (with Svend Holsoe, 1985) and 2nd edition (with A. Beyan and C.P. Burrowes), (2001), Liberia: A National Policy in Transition (with S. Byron Tarr), (1988), History of The Episcopal Church in Liberia: 1821-1980, (1992), Liberia and the United States During The Cold War: Limits of Reciprocity (2009), The Annual Messages of the Presidents of Liberia; From Joseph Jenkins Roberts, 1848 to Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, 2010 (an annotated compilation in three volumes- 2011); Liberia, Volume 57, World Bibliographical Series,  (1995),

Liberia and Independent Africa, 1940s to 2012: A Brief Political Profile (2012),  “Constitutional Documents of Liberia, 1820-1861,” Edited by D. Elwood Dunn with the assistance of Mariam Leitner. Available in CONSTITUTIONS OF THE WORLD FROM THE LATE 18TH CENTURY TO THE MIDDLE OF THE 19TH CENTURY (2008)"The Civil War in Liberia: Roots and Prospects for Resolution" in Civil Wars in Africa: Roots and Resolution (1999), and “Liberia's Internal Response to ECOMOG's Interventionist Efforts in Peace-Keeping” in Africa: ECOMOG in Liberia, among others. Dunn is a prolific orator and public speaker, having been called upon twice to provide National Orations of Liberia by two Liberian Presidents; just as he's often called upon to chair special presidential commissions to investigate matters of state. He has been married to Matilda Eeleen Dunn, an Episcopal Priest since 1971 and the couple has four adult children and an enfant grandson.

 Honored for Valuable Services offered

Joseph Saye Larkpor Guannu, Ph.D.

You, Joseph Saye Larkpor Guannu, BA, MA, Ph.D., author, educator, political scientist, diplomat, Director of the Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution, were born in Sanniquellie City, Nimba County, Republic of Liberia, to the union of Mr. Paye Guannu of Gbuyee town and Ms. Kau Maweamon Yokpo of gbuah Davorvyee town, Republic of Liberia, on September 17, 1940.

You received your early education at St. Mary’s Elementary School, a Roman Catholic institution in Sanniquellie. The only instructor during your days was Philip Alexander Dekonrouru Simmonds, an academic disciplinarian of the first order. It was at St. Mary’s that you were baptized and confirmed as a Roman Catholic. On your promotion to the eighth grade and as St. Mary’s did not extend beyond the seventh grade, you matriculated to St. Patrick’s High School in Monrovia from where you graduated along with the late Chief Justice of Liberia Emmanuel Nyan Gbalazeh and Edward Beyan Kesselly, founder of the Unity Party (UP). It was at St. Patrick’s that you created the passion for history through the inspiration of Liberia’s first Roman Catholic priest, Patrick Kla Juiole who hailed from Sikrekpor otherwise known as Grandcess. The opportunity to earn a college education was difficult for youths in and from the rural areas when you graduated from high school. Entering only college was made possible through goodwill of the Roman Catholic prelate, Monsignor William E. Kaiser, Director of Catholic Relief Service (CRS). On the recommendation of Monsignor Kaiser, you were awarded a full scholarship by the College of Great Falls, a Roman Catholic institution in the American state of Montana. This was in 1962, five years after your graduation from high school. It was from the College of Great Falls that you earned the Bachelor of Arts degree in history in 1966.

You, Joseph Saye Larkpor Guannu, were still determined to dig deeper in the fountain of knowledge after Glassboro. Such was here; you matriculated prestigious Fordham University, a Roman Catholic institution located in New York City. Based on your outstanding performance at Fordham and deplorable financial condition, the school granted you a presidential scholarship at the end of the first semester. You remained on that assistance until you earned your doctorate degree in political science in 1972. While at Fordham, you were the recipient of a grant from the institute for International Education, the Phelps Stokes Fund and the Ford Foundation. Your thirst for knowledge led you to the University of Becauson , France, in 1969, to continue your study of French as a second language, a major recruitment for terminal degree. Upon the completion of the course requirements for the doctoral program, you joined the faculty of Glassboro State College in new Jersey, the United States of America, where you taught history and political science for seven years and rose to the rank of associate professor. The contribution which you have made to education in Liberia needs no demonstration. Your publications, the majority of which are text books, include Liberia History Up to 1847, A Short History of the First Liberian Republic, Liberian History Since 1980, and Liberian Civics. You are also credited with compiling, editing and publishing the volumes, Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of Liberia, from Joseph Jenkins Roberts, 1848 to William Richard Tolbert Jr., 1976 and human rights and Fundamentals Freedoms, Books I-III.

You, Joseph Saye Larkpor Guannu, are a member of several professional organizations that include Liberian Studies Associate, Liberian Historical Society and African Studies Association

You, Joseph Saye Larkpor Guannu, returned to your homeland in 1977 at the end of your teaching tour in New Jersey and accepted the post of Director of Liberian Foreign Service Institute at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the United State and Canada. In 1983, you were recalled and reassigned to the People Republic of China. Although you were commissioned and even departed for the post, you never reached the shores of Beijing. You were recalled en route and later relieved in 1984. The exigencies of domestics politics explain this chapter in our Liberian history.

You, Joseph Saye Larkpor Guannu, your passion for impacting knowledge led you to join the faculty of Cuttington University in 1984. After four years as associate professor and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, you volunteer your services and returned home to Sanniquellie where you engage yourself in reading and research until the first Liberian Civil War erupted in December 1989. As a political animal in the Aristotelian tradition, you entered active politics in 1990 and served in the Interim Government of National Unity as Minister of State for Presidential Affairs up to 1994.

You, Joseph Saye Larkpor Guannu, joined the faculty of the University of Liberia in 1998 and taught at the Ibrahim Babangida Graduate School on International Studies. Also in 1998, you and Cuttington University reached a mutual agreement for you to rejoin Cuttington. You accepted as evidenced today.

You, Joseph Saye Larkpor Guannu, in recognition of your selfless and meritorious services to Liberia in general and Cuttington University in particular, the Board of Trustees of Cuttington University, on the day 22nd Day of February A.D 2018,  being the 129th anniversary of our University resolved to name the Institute of Peace and Conflict Resolution as The Joseph Guannu Institute of Peace and Conflict Resolution.